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Photo Credit: photos by Carlos Barria | Reuters

‘We will be protected by God,’ Trump declares in inaugural address

WASHINGTON — President Donald J. Trump told the nation in his inaugural address that it need not fear in the days ahead.

"There should not be fear," Trump said Jan. 20. "We are protected and we will always be protected. We will be protected by the great men and women of our military and law enforcement, and, most important, we will be protected by God."

In signaling a new era for the United States, "at the bedrock of our politics will be a total allegiance to the United States of America, and through our loyalty to our country, we will rediscover our loyalty to each other," Trump said in his 15-minute address. "When you open your heart to patriotism, there is no room for prejudice. The Bible tells us how good and pleasant it is when God's people live together in unity. We must speak our minds openly, debate our disagreements honestly, but always pursue solidarity. When America is united, America is totally unstoppable."

He said Americans of all stripes harbor common hopes and dreams.

"We all enjoy the same glorious freedoms," Trump said, "and we all salute the same great American flag. And whether a child is born in the urban sprawl of Detroit or the windswept plains of Nebraska, they look up at the same night sky, they fill their heart with the same dreams, and they are infused with the breath of life by the same almighty Creator."

Much of the rest of Trump's inaugural address restated the themes he used in his presidential campaign, remarking repeatedly that the nation and its citizens would be his top priority as president.

"Today we are not merely transferring power from one administration to another or from one party to another," Trump said from the west front of the Capitol, "but we are transferring power from Washington, D.C., and giving it back to you, the people."

Trump distilled the ills he saw in the United States: "Mothers and children trapped in poverty in our inner cities, rusted-out factories scattered like tombstones across the landscape of our nation. An education system flush with cash but which leaves our young and beautiful students deprived of all knowledge. And the crime and the gangs and the drugs that have stolen too many lives and robbed our country of so much unrealized potential. This American carnage stops right here and stops right now."

The 45th president, who is a Presbyterian, said: "From this day forward, it's going to be only America first. America first. Every decision on trade, on taxes, on immigration, on foreign affairs will be made to benefit American workers and American families. We must protect our borders from the ravages of other countries making our products, stealing our companies and destroying our jobs. Protection will lead to great prosperity and strength."

Words of congratulations as well as caution emerged from political and religious leaders as President Donald J. Trump was inaugurated Jan. 20.

Pope Francis sent best wishes and prayers to incoming President Trump shortly after he took the oath of office.

"I offer you my cordial good wishes and the assurance of my prayers that almighty God will grant you wisdom and strength in the exercise of your high office," the pope's message said.

Saying that the human family faces "grave humanitarian crises" that demand "farsighted and united political responses," the pope said he would pray that Trump's decisions "will be guided by the rich spiritual and ethical values that have shaped the history of the American people and your nation's commitment to the advancement of human dignity and freedom worldwide."

Sister Mary Pellegrino, president of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious and a member of the Congregation of St. Joseph, and Atonement Father Brian F. Terry, president of the Conference of Major Superiors or Men, reminded the incoming president of the gift and responsibility of leadership.

"In order to be 'one nation under God,' we believe we are all called to live as true ambassadors or reconciliation, in all places and all times," the leaders said. "We believe we need a president who transcends party politics and personal agendas in order to heal deep divisions that threaten the stability of our nation. We strongly believe that we all need to be dedicated to respectful and dignified civil discourse with those whose positions different from our own."

The letter concluded by inviting the Trump to join them in "constant prayer that God might act in our hearts and through our actions as leaders."

Before the swearing-in ceremonies, the Trump family attended a private prayer service St. John's Episcopal Church across Lafayette Square from the White House. Hosting the service has been a tradition for the church for at least a dozen presidential inaugurals.

At the Capitol, New York Cardinal Timothy M. Dolan was among a number of religious leaders taking part in the inauguration ceremonies. The cardinal read a passage from the Book of Wisdom.

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas administered the oath of office to Vice President Mike Pence, then U.S. Chief Justice John Roberts administered the oath to Trump. Standing at the new president's side were his wife, Melania, and children Donald Jr., Barron, Ivanka, Eric and Tiffany. 

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